The Brush and Palette Club (London) Workshop — November 2018

I was visiting London, Ontario, to teach a one-day botanical drawing workshop (Floral Portraits with Pen & Ink and Watercolour) for the London-based, Brush and Palette Club. The last time I was here to teach a workshop was in 2014, and the the weather was less than accommodating (see below).

Thankfully, this time (above), there was only a sprinkling of the white stuff, the road conditions were perfect for driving and the day presented a sunny blue sky and picture-postcard scenery.

Above and below: The workshop was held at  Riverside United Church on Riverside Drive in London.

The Brush and Palette Club is a not-for-profit organization, now in its 46nd year. The club is dedicated to providing a supportive arts and social environment for its members to learn, grow, interact with each other and share ideas. The club started when artist and teacher, Dorothy Heaven started painting classes for a small group of interested women. When the sessions ended, the remaining group members formed The Brush and Palette Club. At first the group met in the home of Wyn Slemon — who continues to be a very active member of the group. By 1989, the original group had grown to 50 and the need for more space brought them to St. Aiden’s Church Hall and then to Riverside United Church. The membership has grown to over 110 members with a substantial waiting list.

Check out the website.

www.brushandpaletteclub.com

Above: Early morning light in a spacious, inviting room at the church.

Below: A selection of my botanical works.

The Workshop

The workshop brought together a group of talented artists interested in learning more about using pen & ink and watercolour in botanical art.

The project for the day was my drawing of a group of poppies, completed first in pen & ink as shown below.

Below: Working from her own poppy reference photo, Helen Bruzas, an experienced artist and teacher in her own right, first establishes a light base undertone in graphite.

Below: Members of The London Brush & Palette Club.

It was quite a challenge to complete a detailed botanical project in one session but that was the goal I had set for the workshop and everyone remained focused and engaged throughout the day. We had a large group of 26 participants and got started early. My idea was to complete various sections of the poppies at each stage so that if we ran out of time, the artists would have the information on hand to complete the project at their own pace at home. I began by going over the initial drawing process and then discussed how to set up and transfer a line drawing onto a good quality surface — in this case Peterboro #79 cold-pressed illustration board.

Above and below: Once the graphite layer is completed the work begins, applying the first and second layers of ink. Detailed instructional pages are provided to ensure success in the process. The graphite tonal base provides a framework on where to apply the ink.

The graphite undertone base has been established and two pen & ink layers are added. Once the pen & ink rendering is completed the graphite is erased.

Pens used in the project were Micron 005, 01 and 03.

Below: The next step in the process is to add subtle watercolour washes (time permitting) to compliment but not overpower the delcate pen & ink work in the drawing.

A combination of delicate hatch lines and stippling with dots adds dramatic contrast to the drawing.

Below: Poppies completed in pen & ink on illustration board.

Below: Transparent washes added over the pen & ink drawing.

A few kind words from Brush & Palette Club member, Jacqueline Kinsey and her two finished projects below: Poppies and Iris

“Absolutely fantastic step-by-step teaching methods! Michael’s teaching allows for different levels of artists, from beginners to professional, to acquire a new method of drawing and painting in ink and watercolour. I feel that he gave everyone their share of attention throughout the workshop.”

This is my last workshop for 2018. Winter is setting in and it is time to hibernate and catch up on some new projects for next year. I hope also that my book on botanical art will be finished and ready for publication in 2019 (see cover below).

My next workshop will be on March 30 & 31, 2019, at the Toronto Botanical Garden (777 Lawrence Ave. E. North York, Toronto).

To register contact Michael Spillane at 905-891-8422

Email: michael@spillane-arts.com

Or: contact the Toronto Botanical Garden at 416-397-1340

Hope to see you all soon!

Michael Spillane

http://www.spillane-arts.com

 

 

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Aurora Cultural Centre Workshop — October 2018

This was my second visit to the Aurora Cultural Centre in October to teach a one day workshop titled, Brilliant Colours of Fall in Coloured Pencil. The air was crisp, the sky was blue and the fall colours vibrant… a glorious day for a workshop.

The Town of Aurora

The town of Aurora is located approximately 40 minutes north of Toronto and is consistently ranked as one of the top places to live in Canada. With its picturesque rolling hills and heavily treed woodlots, Aurora has managed to blend its small-town charm and historic downtown core with a thriving urban and suburban centre. Aurora is the childhood home of Lester B. Pearson, Prime Minister of Canada from 1963 to 1968. In 1851 the population of Aurora, then known as Machell’s Corners (after a local merchant), was 100 residents. In 1854 the name of the settlement was changed by postmaster Charles Doan to Aurora – meaning goddess of the dawn in Roman mythology. The settlement was incorporated as a village in 1863 with a growing business community, several factories and mills, five churches and a school house. By 1869 the population had grown to 1200 and in 1888 Aurora became a town. On April 8, 2010, the town re-opened the historic and fully renovated Church Street School as the Aurora Cultural Centre.

Aurora Cultural Centre

It is the vision of the Aurora Cultural Centre to provide a facility that enhances cultural life in the area through the fostering of art practice and presentation, production and reception. Since 2010, the centre has welcomed the community to participate in diverse creative experiences for all ages. Located in a beautifully-restored 1886 schoolhouse, the Aurora Cultural Centre is a charming historical treasure featuring four gallery exhibition spaces, a range of instructional classes for children, teens and adults, an eclectic live music series, special family events, summer arts camps, and stunning rental spaces for community activities and partnership participation. The centre is a registered charity, funded in part by the town of Aurora. The professional staff is supported by a dedicated volunteer board of directors and enthusiastic team of volunteers. The building is wheelchair accessible, air-conditioned with parking surrounding the building.

The Aurora Cultural Centre is located at 22 Church Street, Aurora, Ontario.

Phone: (905) 713-1818
info@auroraculturalcentre.ca
Check out the website to see what is happening!

http://auroraculturalcentre.ca

The Workshop

Brilliant Colours of Fall

We had one day to complete a project from start to finish in coloured pencil and it was a toss up between a crisp fall apple and one of the ubiquitous Cucurbits — an ornamental gourd. We decided on the apple, as shown below. The apple was done using Prismacolor Premier Coloured Pencils.

Below: Ornamental gourd in coloured pencil, ideal for a fall botanical workshop. The gourd was done using Faber-Castell Polychromos Coloured Pencils

Prismacolor Premier Coloured Pencils

These are professional-quality, wax-based coloured pencils originated by Berol in 1938 and later manufactured by a company called Sandford in Illinois. They have been around for a long time and are still one of my preferences for botanical work. They come in a range of 132 colours and can be purchased individually or in boxed sets. There is a good general starter set available with twelve pencils. Wax-based pencils tend to be softer than oil-based ones which make them ideal for blending gradations to a smooth finish. Due to their softness, however, they often break easily and it is difficult to maintain a sharp point. Wax-based pencils can be used individually or in combination with oil-based brands such as Faber-Castell Polychromos, which do maintain a sharp point.

Faber-Castell Polychromos Coloured Pencils
The renowned German company, Faber-Castell, is the oldest pencil manufacturer in the world and its Polychromos line of oil-based coloured pencils has been around since 1908. Polychromos (meaning many colours) pencils come in a range of 120 colours and have excellent lightfast pigments that blend well and maintain a sharp point without breaking.

Above: First a light graphite base was established over the apple, followed by a light spray with workable fixative to prevent the graphite from smudging. A light base of Deco Yellow (Prismacolor 1011) was applied over the graphite and burnished with a white pencil.

Below: Orange, vermillion and red colours are added to develop the apple. (Note: A step-by-step project package of the apple is available for purchase on my website — www.spillane-arts.com)

Step-by-step page handouts from start to finish help students to work through each stage of the project.

Burnishing with a white pencil helps to break down the colour layers and give a more “painterly” look to the project, rather than it being immediately identified as a colour pencil drawing.

Amazing reproduction!

From grey to full colour.

Project completed.

An apple a day…

My final workshop before the winter sets in is for The London Brush & Palette Club, in London, Ontario, and is titled Floral Portraits in Pen & Ink and Watercolour. I had put on a workshop for this very talented group of artists in November (same time) 2014. This is what the weather was like at that time! I am hoping it will be far less snow this November!

Check out the London Brush & Palette Club website:

brushandpaletteclub.com

Hope to see you soon!

Michael Spillane

http://www.spillane-arts.com

 

Toronto Botanical Gardens Workshop — October, 2018

I was back at the Toronto Botanical Gardens on October 13 & 14 for another two-day botanical drawing workshop titled, Floral Portraits with Pen & Ink and Watercolour.

Magnificent colours and textures fill the autumn landscape.

Below: Striking fall asters (Symphyotrichum oblongifolium)

About the Toronto Botanical Garden

The Toronto Botanical Garden is located in Toronto’s Edwards Gardens and is a gardening education and information centre. Termed “The little garden with big ideas,” the TBG opened in 1958 and features a superb collection of themed “city-sized gardens.”

Edwards Gardens is a public park, owned and administered by the City of Toronto, whereas the Toronto Botanical Garden is a volunteer-driven charity dedicated to disseminating horticultural and gardening information to the public. Alexander Milne, a Scottish miller, settled his family and built his business on the site that we now know as Edwards Gardens in 1817. The land stayed in the Milne family for over a hundred years. Subsequent owners made some improvements to the property, but the area eventually became over-grown and weed-ridden. In 1944, a Toronto businessman, Rupert Edwards, bought the property to fulfill his dream of creating a magnificent country garden with wide open spaces and plenty of room to move and breath.

Below: Statues provide striking accents and focal points as you wander around the gardens

Edwards transformed the property into a glorious garden, boasting one of the largest rockeries in Canada, a private 9-hole golf course and a safe haven for wildlife. Ten years later, when the city began to encroach upon the property, Edwards decided to sell. Wanting to preserve the estate as a public park, he sold it to the then Metro (Toronto) Council.

Below: Beautiful roses still bursting with colour and fragrance in mid october!

In 1956, Edwards Gardens was opened to the public and the Garden Club of Toronto shared Milne House facilities with The Federation of Ontario Naturalists. The Garden Club wanted to establish a facility which would provide horticultural information to the public and to that end, the Toronto Botanical Garden was established.

Below: Striking fall colours!

The Toronto Botanical Garden is located at 777 Lawrence Avenue East at Leslie Street, in Toronto, Ontario.

Phone: 416-397-1340

The gardens are open year-round from dawn until dusk and admission is free of charge. Check out their website to see what is happening!

www.torontobotanicalgarden.ca

The Workshop

Floral Portraits with Pen & Ink and Watercolour

Project 1 Bearded Iris: The first step was to sketch the iris using my list of observational techniques to help in the drawing process. Then the sketch was cleaned up and the line drawing transferred onto cold press Peterboro #79 illustration board and toned in graphite (as shown below). It is important to have an accurate representation of the form of the plant in graphite before applying ink.

Below: Once the graphite layer is completed, the work begins applying the first and second layers of ink. Detailed instructional pages are provided to ensure success in the process. The graphite tonal base provides a framework on where to apply the ink. See below:

Below: Completed in pen & ink.

More completed pen & ink examples.

Above: The graphite undertone base has been established and two pen & ink layers are added. Once the pen & ink rendering is completed, the graphite undertone is erased.

Pens used in the project were Micron 005, 01 and 03.

Below: The next step in the process is to create watercolour swatches to match the colours of the original iris. The watercolour washes are going to be applied in very subtle transparent layers, so as not to detract from the intricate pen & ink work. I provided colour swatch handouts based on my initial analysis of the true iris colours.

Below: Completed iris projects in pen and ink and watercolour.

Having completed the iris project it was time to start another pen & ink drawing of a cluster of Poppies.

Same process as for the Iris: Complete a line drawing, then transfer onto cold pressed #79 Peterboro illustration board (One board: 15 x 20 inches accommodated two projects). A tonal rendering in graphite is established before applying the ink.

Below: Iris and poppy on one 15 x 20 inches Peterboro Hi-Art #79 illustration board.

Below: Delicate hatch lines are used more in this project than stippling with dots.

Below: Step-by-step instructional pages guide students through each phase of the project.

My next workshop titled, Brilliant Botanicals of Fall, is on October 20 at the Aurora Cultural Centre in Aurora, Ontario

22 Church St, Aurora, ON

To register contact Michael Spillane at 905-891-8422

Email: michael@spillane-arts.com

Or call the Aurora Cultural Centre at 905-713-1818

Hope to see you all soon!

Michael Spillane

http://www.spillane-arts.com

Southampton Art School Workshop — September 2018

Back again at Southampton Art School & Gallery in September to teach a two-day workshop titled Floral Portraits with Pen & Ink and Watercolour.

Southampton Art School and Gallery can be found in the heart of downtown Southampton and a short walk to pristine, sandy beaches. The facility provides a wonderful teaching environment and also a gallery showcasing regional and local talent. The building has been around since 1957 and is an integral part of the art community of Bruce County. The original community was known as Saugeen by the early settlers but was later named Southampton after the English seaport, when the town was incorporated as a village in 1858. It was later incorporated as a town in 1904. Southampton was also  one of the last communities in Ontario to use the Gaelic language in everyday speech; the language could still be heard by local fishermen as late as the 1930s. Just off the Southampton shore, the Chantry Island Lighthouse is a popular visiting spot for tourists. Boat tours to the island run throughout the summer months. As well as Chantry island, the town is close to Sauble Beach, Port Elgin and Saugeen First Nation.

Below: Southampton Art School

Below: Southampton Art Centre Gallery

The Workshop

Floral Portraits with Pen & Ink and Watercolour Washes

Project 1 Bearded Iris: The first step was to sketch the iris using my list of observational techniques to help in the drawing process. Then the sketch was cleaned up and the line drawing transferred onto cold press Peterboro #79 illustration board and toned in graphite (as shown below). It is important to have an accurate representation of the form of the plant in graphite before applying ink.

Once the graphite layer is completed, the work begins applying the first and second layers of ink. Detailed instructional pages are provided to ensure success in the process. The graphite tonal base provides a framework on where to apply the ink. See below:

Above: The graphite undertone base has been established and two pen & ink layers are added. Once the pen & ink rendering is completed, the graphite undertone is erased.

Pens used in the project were Micron 005, 01 and 03.

Below: The next step in the process is to create watercolour swatches to match the colours of the original iris. The watercolour washes are going to be applied in very subtle transparent layers, so as not to detract from the intricate pen & ink work. I provided colour swatch handouts based on my initial analysis of the true iris colours.

Work in progress.

Every project different but perfectly rendered.

Below: Lighter violet tones.

Below: More of a rose colour.

Below: A striking blue iris.

Having completed the iris project it was time to start another pen & ink drawing of a cluster of Poppies.

Same process as for the Iris: Complete a line drawing, then transfer onto cold pressed #79 Peterboro illustration board (One board: 15 x 20 inches accommodated two projects). A tonal rendering in graphite is established before applying the ink.

Delicate hatch lines are used more in this project than stippling with dots.

Detailed and delicate work.

Below: Two projects side by side on one illustration board.

What a wonderful medium!

Unfortunately not enough time to complete the watercolour on this project! Next time…

My next workshop titled Brilliant Botanicals of Fall is on October 20 (one day) at Aurora Cultural Centre in Aurora, Ontario.

Contact Michael Spillane at 905-891-8422 for more information.

Email: michael@spillane-arts.com

Hope to see you all soon!

Michael Spillane

http://www.spillane-arts.com

 

 

 

 

 

Southampton Art School Workshop — August 2018

Once more I was back at Southampton Art School & Gallery in August to teach a three-day workshop titled Magnificent Florals in Watercolour.

Southampton Art School and Gallery can be found in the heart of downtown Southampton and a short walk to pristine, sandy beaches. The facility provides a wonderful teaching environment and also a gallery showcasing regional and local talent. The building has been around since 1957 and is an integral part of the art community of Bruce County. The original community was known as Saugeen by the early settlers but was later named Southampton after the English seaport, when the town was incorporated as a village in 1858. It was later incorporated as a town in 1904. Southampton was also  one of the last communities in Ontario to use the Gaelic language in everyday speech; the language could still be heard by local fishermen as late as the 1930s. Just off the Southampton shore, the Chantry Island Lighthouse is a popular visiting spot for tourists. Boat tours to the island run throughout the summer months. As well as Chantry island, the town is close to Sauble Beach, Port Elgin and Saugeen First Nation.

Beautiful Canna Lilies were in full bloom in the school courtyard garden, thriving in the August sunshine.

The Workshop

Magnificent Florals in Watercolour

This three-day workshop has been designed for the botanical artist looking to be able to paint realistic and vibrant floral portraits in watercolour. A step-by-step handout system teaches students the process of botanical painting in watercolour, from setting up a suitable subject to establishing a good composition and then following through to produce the finished painting. Demonstrations, one-on-one interaction with students and detailed instructional handouts help to provide a successful model for teaching. The workshop covers the drawing process, composition, how to transfer the drawing and prepare it for painting. colour theory and various watercolour painting techniques. Studies and exercises lead up to the completion of a finished watercolour floral painting.

Above: My watercolour painting, Zinnia elegans, the botanical subject for the workshop.

The drawing was first established as a sketchbook study using a series of observational drawing techniques. The finished line drawing was then transferred onto watercolour paper and a neutral grey underpainting (or shading) served to create a monochromatic three-dimensional painting. Liquid masking fluid was applied to the brightest areas of the flowers and leaves before painting the undertone.

The neutral tone I used for the underpainting was a mix of cadmium red, cadmium yellow, burnt sienna, ultramarine blue and Payne’s grey. The three primary colours, red, yellow and blue, form a good mix for a neutral underpainting and can be modified (depending on the subject) by adding a warmer tone such as burnt sienna (or vermillion), a cooler tone such as cobalt blue or a neutral grey to the mix.

Above and below: From a line drawing to a three-dimensional tonal image.

Below: Applying the first layers of colour.

Below: The leaves are masked and painted with a neutral undertone; the masking is then removed and colour is built up in thin layers as shown on the leaf below.

Flowers are formed through layers of yellow, yellow/orange orange and orange/red.

Step-by-step instructional handouts provide an efficient system to reproduce the Zinnia floral project.

Below: Almost completed.

Below: Work in progress.

After almost two days spent in deep concentration to complete the magnificent, yet complex Zinnia floral project, I decided to change direction a little and provide the students with a serene landscape for the next project. Not a botanical subject, I admit, but a welcome change from the technical requirements of botanical painting.

Here is the finished watercolour pastoral landscape, complete with rolling hills in the distance and a foreground bursting with clusters of striking umbelliferous Queen Anne’s Lace wildflowers (see, I didn’t completely abandon the botanical theme of the workshop).

Above: Two completed landscape paintings.

Above: Establishing the horizon line and sky.

Below: Adding the green base.

Below: The hills are alive…

Trees added to the scene and the foreground masked. The wildflowers are added using white gouache and the edge of a small, bristle fan brush.

Eureka!

Below: Pastoral landscape.

I will be returning to Southampton Arts Centre for my next workshop, Floral Portraits with Pen & Ink and Watercolour on September 19 & 20, 2018.

Southampton Art School & Gallery

201 High Street, Southampton, Ontario
Telephone: (519) 797-5068
Toll Free: 1-800-806-8838

Hope to see you there!

Michael Spillane

http://www.spillane-arts.com

 

Guelph School of Art Workshop — August 2018

I was back again at the Guelph School of Art (Guelph, Ontario) on August 11 & 12 for another botanical drawing workshop. The workshop titled Floral Portraits in Pen & Ink and Watercolour, provided an interesting mix of mediums for the botanical artist looking to expand their horizons with something a little different.

The Town of Guelph

Known as “The Royal City,” (named after British Royal Family monarch, King George the IV), Guelph was founded on April 23, 1827, and officially became a town on January 1, 1856. Guelph was chosen as the name for the town because it was one of the family names of British royalty and had, apparently, never been used as a place name before. Guelph is located in southwestern Ontario, roughly 28 kilometres (17 miles) east of Waterloo and 100 kilometres (62 miles) west of Toronto. The town is consistently rated as one of Canada’s best places to live and it plays a very important role in the history of Remembrance Day as Canadian physician, soldier, teacher and poet John McCrae who wrote the poem “In Flanders Fields” was born in Guelph, Ontario on November 30, 1872.

Wyndham Art Supplies: A cornucopia of supplies for the artist. On the third floor, the Guelph School of Art — both housed in the same building.

Wyndham Art Supplies has been providing the city of Guelph and surrounding area with art supplies for over 20 years. The location is also home to the Guelph School of Art and also boasts a fantastic picture framing department on the second floor.

Come visit at 125 Wyndham St. N. Guelph, ON.

The Workshop

Floral Portraits with Pen & Ink and Watercolour Washes

Above: Some of my botanical art projects on display.

Below: Pen & ink drawings with watercolour — Iris and poppy.

Guelph 1

On the first morning of the workshop, the Iris was sketched and transferred onto cold press Peterboro #79 illustration board and toned in graphite (as shown below). It is important to have an accurate representation of the form of the plant in graphite before applying ink.

Below: Iris completed in graphite.

Once the graphite layer is completed, the work begins applying the first layers of ink. Detailed instructional pages are provided to ensure success in the process. The graphite tonal base provides a framework on where to apply the ink.

Pens used in the project were Micron 005, 01 and 03.

Below: Completed in pen & ink.

Every project different but perfectly rendered.

Below: The next step in the process is to create watercolour swatches to match the colours of the original iris. The watercolour washes are going to be applied in very subtle transparent layers, so as not to detract from the intricate pen & ink work. I provided colour swatch handouts based on my initial analysis of the true iris colours.

Above and below: Work in progress.

Below: Completed iris projects in pen and ink and watercolour.

Having completed the Iris project we still had time to start another drawing — Poppies in pen & ink.

Same process as for the Iris: Complete a line drawing, then transfer onto cold pressed #79 Peterboro illustration board (One board: 15 x 20 inches accommodated two projects). Prepare a tonal rendering in graphite before applying the ink.

Below: Moving on to the pen & ink layers.

Below: Alan Norsworthy showing off his drawing.

Unfortunately not enough time to complete the watercolour on this project! Next time…

My next workshop, Magnificent Florals in Watercolour is on August 23, 24 & 25 at: Southampton Arts Centre Art School & Gallery.

I am also teaching this same workshop — Floral Portraits with Pen & Ink and Watercolour at Southampton Art School on September 19 & 20.

201 High Street, Southampton, Ontario
Telephone: (519) 797-5068
Toll Free: 1-800-806-8838

Hope to see you there!

Michael Spillane

http://www.spillane-arts.com

 

 

 

Southampton Art School Workshop — July, 2018

I was back at Southampton Art School & Gallery in July to teach another botanical drawing workshop titled Brilliant Florals with Coloured Pencils.

Above and below: The beauty of Lake Huron, in all its variations.

Southampton

The town of Southampton is located at the mouth of the Saugeen River on the shores of Lake Huron, in Bruce County (Ontario), and is one of my favourite places to visit during the summer months. It is a popular tourist and retirement destination and known for its magnificent sunsets.

Southampton Art School and Gallery can be found in the heart of downtown Southampton and a short walk to pristine, sandy beaches. The facility provides a wonderful teaching environment and also a gallery showcasing regional and local talent. The building has been around since 1957 and is an integral part of the art community of Bruce County. The original community was known as Saugeen by the early settlers but was later named Southampton after the English seaport, when the town was incorporated as a village in 1858. It was later incorporated as a town in 1904. Southampton was also  one of the last communities in Ontario to use the Gaelic language in everyday speech; the language could still be heard by local fishermen as late as the 1930s. Just off the Southampton shore, the Chantry Island Lighthouse is a popular visiting spot for tourists. Boat tours to the island run throughout the summer months. As well as Chantry island, the town is close to Sauble Beach, Port Elgin and Saugeen First Nation.

Southampton Art School and Gallery

The Workshop

Early morning and ready for class.

Brilliant Florals with Coloured Pencils

Coloured pencils can be used alone or combined with graphite. They are easy to use and convenient to store and replace. The workshop covered techniques such as burnishing, blending and layering with coloured pencils, along with accurate colour matching, tonal rendering and composition. I used detailed step-by-step instructional handouts, demonstrations and one-on-one interaction with students to complete the botanical portraits.

We spent the first day of the workshop developing a Cattleya orchid, from step-by-step instructional pages. First a grey monochromatic (one colour) tonal base was established. This base undertone was rendered with grey coloured pencils prior to adding colour.  I used Faber Castell Polychromos coloured pencils throughout the project, although some of the students came with Prismacolor Premier coloured  pencils which were cross-indexed to match the right colours.

Above: Monochromatic undertone.

Above and below: Completed Cattleya orchid in coloured pencil.

Alstromeria or Peruvian Lily
Alstromeria, also known as the Peruvian Lily or Lily of the Incas, produces beautiful blooms ranging in colour from white, pink and salmon to bright orange, red and purple. Although the plant is poisonous and also a skin irritant, it is commonly grown for the cut flower market. Alstromeria is a genus of flowering plants in the family Alstroemeriaceae. They are native to South America although some have become naturalized in the United States, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, Madeira and the Canary Islands.

Let’s look at the Alstromeria drawing: First an accurate line drawing is completed.

Below: Step two: Monochromatic undertone in grey coloured pencils.

Above and below: First layer of colour on the leaves.

Step-by-step handout pages provide detailed instructions on each stage of the project.

Next the flowers are developed.

Below: Completed Alstromeria project.

My next workshop titled Floral Portraits with Pen & Ink and Watercolour will be at the Guelph School of Art — 125 Wyndham St N, Guelph, ON — on August 11 & 12.

Check out the GSA website for all course and workshop listings. www.gsaguelph.com

Telephone: 519-767-1317
Toll Free: 1-800-560-1970

I will be back at Southampton Art School August 23, 24 & 25 to teach another botanical art workshop: Magnificent Florals in Watercolour. Check out the website for more information.

http://www.southamptonartschool.com

Southampton Arts Centre
Art School & Gallery
201 High Street,
Southampton, Ontario N0H 2L0
Telephone: (519) 797-5068
Toll Free: 1-800-806-8838

Hope to see you soon!

Michael Spillane

http://www.spillane-arts.com